Tap Gallery Leslie Dimmick’s ‘Drive’ Exhibition Opening, and 65th Birthday Party 14th April 2018

Tap Gallery Leslie Dimmick’s ‘Drive’ Exhibition Opening, and 65th Birthday Party 14th April 2018 was a really lovely night full of really interesting people. I don’t think there was one person there that wasn’t interesting. So many artists in the one gallery! Leslie’s ‘Drive’ Exhibition works were beautiful, bold, and some quite industrial and technical. These works showed space at a distance taking you into the picture and feeling like you were being there yourself.

The gallery was packed. Leslie looked as glamourous as the day I first met her ten years ago.

Pippa, an 87 yr old lady sang lots of fun post war songs and she brought the house down with her bright eyed talent and entertaining spirit. I got to speak with her for quite some time, and every moment was a narrative in a time gone by.

Gilda sang so beautifully, with her sultry voice, and beautiful appearance.

Poetry was recited, and speeches made by loving colleagues and friends.

Debra Keenan made a brilliant speech among others that also applauded the talented birthday artist.

I also sang a song to celebrate Leslie’s lovely birthday and exhibition bash. A pleasure to add to the fun.

As the night faded, the left over people ended up at a lovely French restaurant in Crown Street, Sydney. Here are a few more images of the night:

Good friends celebrate! Leslie, Mor Mor Mutthi Mutthi and Debra Keenan.

The lovely Gilda.

Amazing Pippa.

90 yrs plus Janet Venn-Browne still practising artist was also there. Such fun.

 

Artist Anna Boros smiles for the camera.

Mary Pace ‘Hanging Out’ Exhibition

Mary Pace ‘ Hanging Out ‘ Exhibition Opening on 31st March 2018

Exhibition finishes- 7th April 2018 At the Sheffer Gallery, Lander Street Darlington NSW

Here are some fanciful images of the Opening. It was a really lovely Opening with good wine and art chat! Lots of it, and its really great to meet such talented artists around the art traps! Mary is fun and lively, smart and keen eyed! Many wonderful life stories to tell. 🙂 Thoroughly enjoyable.

Anna Boros speaking with artist Mary pace.

Mary and her artist partner Bill Wilson.

 

…and following through with a great Greek dinner afterwards at Newtown.

Valerie

Pastel on Canvas.

‘Valerie’ is the title for this drawing on canvas. The definition of the name Valerie, is actually an Old English name derived from the Roman male version of the name with the same meaning: Valiant and courageous.
The  narrative is explained further in What’s on? What’s New? Blog It On!  section.

Nepean Art Society Exhibition 24-26 March 2018

Some galleries are really fine, and the area is so large that one can peruse the art works singularly and really absorb the image. Other galleries are makeshift, and the works are bunched up together like a shop store with racks of lollies and foodstuffs to grab on your way out.  This was one such exhibition, unfortunately. I was quite unimpressed really, though I could see that the volunteers were ardent in trying to make it the best possible appearance. With cramped space, and very small room, with newly acquired ‘set up ‘walls’ to hang as many works for sale on . This was definitely not what you would really call an ‘exhibition’ in the usual art gallery professional sense. It was a setup to just sell art. No space other than a metre in front of the artwork, and trying not to take in the other artwork beside it by only inches apart. Each artist’s works were lumped together. I think I will have to find another venue where there’s a bit more space. No. A lot more space.  I was dismayed, as I had seen Nepean Art Society in years gone by, have larger venues and space. What I saw here was saddening.

When entering the works for bump in, everything was so cramped, and the artist’s  line- up went out into the street. Once you entered the doorway, you entered a very, very tiny room where it was barely enough room to hold your work. There was one person behind me , and one person in front of me, in single file, and that’s how much room that little room had. Once were were in to the next room for the actually bump in, an area surrounded by about four tables, arranged as a corner of two desks per side blocked you in from going any further. Your had about a one metre space to work in for the bumping in and signing, then to turn around and keep saying ‘excuse me’, and bumping into people all the way out. This is supposed to be the huge city of Penrith,  and the only space available for artists is this appalling situation. What has the world come to when it treats its creatives like this and forces them into ‘rabbit enclosures’ like this!? Something has to be done about this. I will think on this more as time goes on…The volunteers are dealing the best way they know how with the least tools.

The Opening itself was quaint, and of course the room cramped. Perhaps I’m being harsh, and I’m used to being spoilt by much nicer experiences? But no. This situation should not be for artists in a big city like Penrith. This is Nepean Art Society, and the exhibition was more like a school tuck shop space rather than a real life gallery. I felt I was in the country on a country farm where the owner made your scones, milked the cow, ran the farm, and asked ‘the locals’ to put up your works in case any ‘out- of- towners’  might like to buy’.

Casual, nice, quaint, and needing Penrith Council aid and commission Nepean Art Society badly needs help for their artists to exhibit their works in larger venues.  Penrith City  should be very proud of their artists. But are they…?

Fairy Iris Charm was submitted.  The main theme of the displayed artworks were paintings mainly of the bush. I saw some other interesting works which I could see were from young artists- more conceptual, and some of animals, but like Fairy Iris Charm, fell in sharp contrast with bush paintings. The young ones are trying, but can they compete with favoured genres of traditional art rather than conceptual?

 

 

Manumission

 

 

 

This is the 6th pastel drawing work in the series for ‘Everyday Matriarchal Heroines’ which will be part of a series of 12 drawings of heroic women. Manumission is about a story of a woman who was being violated by her previous husband and was rescued from a pathetic fate by the man she is married to today. The intricacies to the story go much deeper, as this beautiful woman also suffers from MS. She works full time and takes a lot of life in her stride. She is grateful that every day is away from her former dreadful past. Having MS is a hard slog, and to know her is to but admire her.

Amour- Propre

 

 

 

Pastel on canvas.        No.5  in the  ‘Everyday Matriarchal Heroines’  Series

See Whats on? What’s New? Blog It On! Section for more information.

Anastasis

 

 

Pastel on canvas.                                                                 12th March 2018

Anastasis means ‘to rise up’, ‘to rise up again’, ‘to be reborn again’, ‘resurrection’, to be ‘resurrected from a debilitating illness’.

To watch helplessly while your little girl’s life is in the balance , can be any parent’s nightmare.
To have faith in something that is believed that cannot be seen, to be there when all else can fail, and to be finally rescued through what seems like a personal nightmare, is now seen as a past memory that makes one shudder at the recall of a memory so  vivid to already be a few years later.

Jewel Of Denial

 

 

 

Pastel on canvas.

This work titled ‘Jewel Of Denial’ is a play on words as any movie goer would know. However, this particular ‘jewel’ does justify her as one true heroine. There are not always problems in trusting family members with your own collateral. This heroine lost almost everything, and came out of a very hard situation a much wiser person for it. See the blog for more information.

This is the third completed work being part of a year long’s series of works,  will be exhibited in the ‘Everyday Matriarchal Heroines’ exhibition at the end of 2018, along with many more “Everyday Matriarchal Heroines’  upcoming project work. (as at 1 March 2018)